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Orange Crush: Revolutionary Friuli producer Radikon after the death of an icon

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At the end of this summer, a weakened Stanislao “Stanko” Radikon reflected with his son, Saša, about their family estate and the long, controversial run of his edgy, dark-hued wines made from white grapes.

In the cellar of the family’s hilltop house in Oslavia, Italy, a town of 600 nestled on the Slovenian border, the men talked about how after struggling for years, “The wines are selling. We have no problems. Everything is OK,” recalls Saša, 34.

Then, on Sept. 11, just days before harvest, Stanko Radikon died after a long battle with cancer.

“We never talked about my taking over,” explains Saša, an enologist who worked side by side with his self-taught father for a decade. “In the cellar, it was just me and him. We did everything together, and we spoke about wine all the time.”

Acting Out with Charlie

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There are three kinds of wine films these days: documentaries on the wine world, dramas set amid the vines and Charlie movies.

Charlie Arturaola, a charismatic Miami-based sommelier, is starring in his second feature film by Argentinean filmmaker Nicolás Carreras. The Duel of Wine, now making the rounds of international film festivals, was shot in some of Italy’s most evocative cities and wine regions, from Piedmont and the Veneto to Umbria and Sardinia.

The White Wizard of Soave

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Leonildo Pieropan is finishing his 50th harvest, hoping to fade into the background as his two sons take over the family’s famous Soave estate.

Sort of.

“He lives upstairs from the winery—so he can not not be involved,” quips eldest son, Andrea, 39, the family agronomist who looks after the vineyards, while brother Dario, 37, runs the cellar.

Both sons, like their father, are also enologists: “Three in one small winery is probably too much,” says Andrea with a laugh.

Accidental Vino

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What's a guy do with 10 acres of Valpolicella grapes and zero wine knowhow?

Growing up in northeastern Italy, Mariano Buglioni never dreamed of becoming a winemaker. As a young man, he worked in his father’s garment business, which produced sportswear for the family’s 50 boutiques in Italy.

Then, in 1993, his father bought the old farmhouse of his dreams, in the heart of Valpolicella Classico. With the property came a 10-acre vineyard planted to the local red varieties Corvina, Corvinone, Molinara and Rondinella, which are used to make fruity Valpolicella as well as denser Amarone, from raisined grapes.

A Sicilian on the Move

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At long last: Donnafugata steps onto Etna

Decades ago, Giacomo Rallo became fascinated with the volcanic vineyards of Mount Etna, long before they became fashionable.

The pioneering founder of western Sicily’s Donnafugata winery “fell in love with the place,” his son, Antonio Rallo, recalls. “He thought he should produce wine on those volcanic soils at high altitude.”

A Barolo Star arrives on Etna-- What's Next?

Davide Rosso drags on a cigarette in his newly acquired vineyards on Sicily’s Mount Etna and gushes, “It’s magic here. … The first time I came, I discovered this energy here.”

It is a near-cloudless day on Etna’s northern slopes, and that energy is palpable: White plumes of smoke rise from the volcano’s peak more than a mile-and-a-half above us; a crystalline morning light shines on vineyard plateaus that have been carved into a rugged landscape sculpted by eruptions.

“In Italy, now, this is the most exciting place for the future,” says Rosso, who in July finalized the purchase of a small estate with more than 13 acres of decades-old vines. He will bring in his first Etna harvest next month. “The frontier is here.”

Brunello Confidential

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Carlo Ferrini is one of Tuscany’s great winemakers. But you probably have not heard of his tiny Montalcino estate, Podere Giodo.

In fact, I didn’t know anything about Giodo until Ferrini drove me there along a rutted, unpaved forest road outside the medieval hamlet of Sant’Angelo in Colle—population around 200.

“I must be discreet,” says Ferrini, 62. A tall, soft-spoken Florentine with silver hair and a thick salt-and-pepper mustache, he is one of Italy’s top consulting enologists. Giodo is his personal project, started over a decade ago, totaling about 1,000 cases a year of Brunello di Montalcino and a simpler IGT Sangiovese. But he keeps the wine low-key so as not to compete with his high-profile clients in Tuscany, which include Barone Ricasoli, Fonterutoli, Brancaia and Talenti.

Along an alley of cypresses, he pulls his dust-covered station wagon up to an abandoned farmhouse surrounded by vineyards with stunning views over the rippling hills to the towering Monte Amiata.

“After more than 35 years of work, this is my dream,” Ferrini says. “I thought it was one of the most beautiful places in Montalcino.”

The son of a bus driver, Ferrini began his enology career in 1979 as a consultant for the Chianti Classico consortium. After 12 years, he struck out on his own...read the full blog (free) at winespectator.com 

Still Crazy

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Italy's fanatic of Grappa thirty years on

I don’t need another liquid pleasure—the world of wine is big enough.

But I recently visited Vittorio Gianni Capovilla in northern Italy and discovered another realm of complex aromas and flavors, in Capovilla’s prized grappas and other distilled spirits.

“Taste this,” said Capovilla. At 70, with his bushy eyebrows and gleaming gray eyes, he looked like a mad scientist as he held out samples of some of the world’s most sought-after distillati. Over 30 years, Capovilla has helped raise grappa—traditionally a lowly spirit made from the grape pomace (skins, pulp, seeds and stems) left over after winemaking—to distinctive levels. Part of his success comes from his slow, low-temperature distillation technique and part of it from impeccable ingredients.

What kind of ingredients? His grappa di Amarone is distilled from the pomace of legendary Amarone producer Romano Dal Forno and his grappa di Ribolla from another legend, Friuli’s Gravner.

After a few sips—and then a few more—I became a believer. Great grappa can show off nuanced flavors.

In his centuries-old farmhouse-turned-distillery near Bassano del Grappa, in the Veneto region, he also produces other distillati from a variety of fresh fruits such as wild raspberries and blueberries, heirloom variety peaches, mirabelle plums and loquats, as well as from beer. “The world of distillati is infinite..." read the full blog (free) at winespectator.com

Superficially Rosé

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Taking Pink Wine to its trendy heights in Saint-Tropez

It's an early summer day in the Saint-Tropez port, which is lined with mega-yachts and suntanned tourists, and Grégoire Chaix fills my glass with a pink liquid he predicts I will not like.

“You are not the target market for this—at all,” the Tropezien winemaker and entrepreneur says at a table of his restaurant, the Bar du Port.

He is pouring—over ice—his 10-year-old invention called Ice Tropez, a sweet and fizzy pink wine cocktail flavored with peach extract that comes in a cylindrical clear glass bottle or a pink can. It tastes like a cross between rosé and Snapple and comes in two versions: one with a low alcohol level of 6.5 percent and a non-alcoholic one made with grape juice.

“The target is young, mostly women, who want something festive and sweet,” he explains. At 45, with a shaved head, tails-out white shirt and jeans, he is the image of a southern French businessman. “Today we need new ways to get young people into wine.”

So, why am I here?

Because pink wine is booming and fashionable, and Chaix represents a wing of the trendy camp here in jet-set Saint-Tropez....read the full blog at winespectator.com

A Deeper Shade of Pink

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Bandol's Chateau Pibarnon bucks the trend of rosé lite

It’s summertime, which can mean firing up the grill, switching off the brain, and pouring lots of rosé—sometimes even over ice.

The world has developed a thirst for highly quaffable, ultrapale rosé, and Provence is its main supplier. By today’s fashion, the lighter the better. (See my blog post on how research into aesthetic preferences has shaded the color of Provence rosé.)

Now, I don’t mean to be a Provence party pooper, but I want to talk about a smaller school of winemakers—let’s call them rosé resisters—who are bucking the trend by making darker, more substantial and complex rosés.

One noteworthy resister is Eric de Saint Victor of Château de Pibarnon in Bandol—the small coastal appellation neighboring the much larger Côtes de Provence. Since 2000, when he took over his family’s stunningly gorgeous 130-acre spread high in the hills above the Mediterranean coast, he has focused not just on Bandol’s flagship powerful reds, but on rich rosés meant to stand up to the local cuisine’s strong flavors, like garlic, saffron, anchovies, sea urchin and roast peppers.

"In Côtes de Provence the higher up you go [in price], the lighter the wine—to where it’s almost a white,” says the blue-eyed Saint Victor, 52, from a hilltop vineyard on a breezy early summer day. “In Bandol, that’s not our way. In Bandol we are used to looking for concentration—even in rosé.”

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